Thinking Patterns (1)

Free Article about Handwriting Analysis As most of you know, students are sending all kinds of questions to me on a daily basis. Every so often, I’ll include one of general interest with the Sunday lessons. Student Question: “I would really like to understand the difference between the thinking patterns. I am a methodical (cumulative) thinker and I’ve got that one down. What is confusing to me are the comprehensive, analytical and investigative thinkers.”   In graphology, thinking has to do with HOW the person thinks, now what he thinks about or how much quality there is to his thinking. “HOW” breaks down into four categories. (1)   Cumulative or methodical thinker – the person who is inclined to consciously process “new” ideas or challenges through a thought process. (2)   Comprehensive thinker – the person who is prone to allow his automatic reactions – based on memories of past experiences – to determine his thoughts in the moments. (3)   Analytical thinker – the person who feels that it is necessary to analyze everything about a given situation (whether he is familiar with it or not) before he is comfortable enough to take action. (4)   Investigative thinker – the person with an inquisitive mind and the desire to explore for himself whatever interests him. He will not be satisfied with second-hand information.  Cumulative thinking Handwriting indicator: Rounded tops on letters m and n indicate cumulative thinking. They are intensified by flat topped “r’s.”   The cumulative thinking pattern Cumulative thinkers consciously process new information in a step-by-step manner to understand it completely. They are concerned with the whole process and each...

Thinking Patterns Continued (2)

Free Article about Handwriting Analysis As most of you know, students are sending all kinds of questions to me on a daily basis. Every so often, I’ll include one of general interest with the Sunday lessons. Student Question “I would really like to understand the difference between the thinking patterns. I am a methodical (cumulative) thinker and I’ve got that one down. What is confusing to me are the comprehensive, analytical and investigative thinkers.”   Analytical thinking Handwriting indicator: Angles at the baseline of middle zone letters (m, n) indicate analytical thinking. (Angles at the bottom of oval letters have an entirely different meaning). The analytical thinking pattern The analytical thinker is foremost interested in analyzing cause and effect. He wants to know the “why” and “how” behind things. He is always figuring out the reason. He feels he must analyze everything about a given situation, even if he is familiar with it. He wants to understand reasons and every step of the process by which conclusions are reached. He wants to gain a clear understanding based upon provable facts before he is comfortable enough to take action on anything. Because he takes every “whole” to pieces to understand “the parts,” it takes him longer to process any situation. Analysis takes time and he takes longer to arrive at his conclusions.If the analytical writer is also an investigative or cumulative thinker, he will be even slower in processing information. Analysis is an excellent trait, but if applied to every little thing, others will lose patience – and rightly so – with the writer. The analytical writer’s “figure, figure” process...

Thinking Patterns Continued (3)

Free Article about Handwriting Analysis As most of you know, students are sending all kinds of questions to me on a daily basis. Every so often, I’ll include one of general interest with the Sunday lessons. Student Question: I would really like to understand the difference between the thinking patterns. I am a methodical (cumulative) thinker and I’ve got that one down. What is confusing to me are the comprehensive, analytical and investigative thinkers.   Investigative thinking   Handwriting indicator: Angles at the upper part of middle zone structures show investigative thinking. The sharper the angles, the more pronounced is the trait. The search for knowledge may be deep probing or it may be just prompted by curiosity, which results in just skimming the surface of the subject. The higher the investigative wedges protrude above the baseline, the deeper the mind probes. The narrower the wedge, the more keenly the writer cuts into and explores knowledge. If the wedges are tall, he likes to explore information in new territories. If the wedges are shallow, they merely indicate curiosity.   The investigative thinking pattern The writer has an inquiring mind and is not an easy person to convince. He wants to investigate all aspects of a situation before becoming involved. His intention is to go directly to the source and he insists on gaining firsthand knowledge through his own efforts. The writer prefers to learn his lessons through his own investigation rather than from other people or books. It is his nature that he wants to experience through his own exploration. The writer is constantly inquiring and has the intellect...

Emphasis

Free Article about Handwriting Analysis Initial emphasis Initial emphasis means exaggeration of the first stroke, letter or word either in size, height, pressure, or form.   Indicators of initial emphasis: Careful execution of all details of the letter. Embellishment of initial letters, words, or strokes. Exaggeratedly high first strokes in capital letters. An exaggeratedly high first stroke in capitals is one of the indicators of an authoritarian personality. Exaggeratedly high capital letters.         Since handwriting is being experienced as “standing,” the tendency to enlarge initial letters “expresses the writer’s preference for dominating forms. This, in turn, says Klages, “is rooted in his self-feelings. Exaggeratedly high initial letters manifest a desire for superiority, a need for greatness. Preyer explains that disproportionate initial height exposes immoderate requests on the part of the writer. Whether in a conversation or a speech he will make excessive demands on others’ time and will always put his own concerns first. Klages theorizes that capitals increasing in height show ambition. This, of course, is in keeping with the interpretation of “looking up,” since to the ambitious person the desired goal seems “higher upon “lofty,” or “elevated.” Extreme narrowness in very tall capitals reveals exaggerated sensitiveness because of unsatisfied needs for recognition.   Mendel speaks of “social timidity, professional jealousy, ambition without adequate imagination, sobriety, coolness” and “rigor.” (Personality in Handwriting, New York 1975, p. 160) Exaggeratedly wide capitals To compensate for strong insecurities, these writers may put up a front of arrogance. In relationships, the can be rude and impertinent. Extremely vulnerable to criticism, they may try keep themselves from losing face by resorting to subterfuge or...